Mary and Max

Recently my dear son T showed me a video clip from the  multi-award winning Australian movie Mary and Max which is about two pen-friends — Mary, a lonely 8 year old girl and Max, a 44 year old man with Asperger’s Syndrome.  T loved the particular clip he found on YouTube, which features a short segment from the movie where Max explains to Mary about his Asperger’s Syndrome …something we could totally relate to!

Please note that although this particular YouTube clip has Portuguese subtitles added to it by the person who uploaded it, the actual  movie does not have subtitles. I would have preferred to use a YouTube clip without the subtitles but this was the only short clip we could find that contained just these particular scenes which focus specifically on Asperger’s Syndrome. Enjoy…

The following synopsis is from the movie’s website http://www.maryandmax.com

Mary and Max is a claymated feature film from the creators of the Academy Award winning short animation HARVIE CRUMPET. It is a simple tale of pen-friendship between two very different people; Mary Dinkle, a chubby, lonely eight year old girl living in the suburbs of Melbourne, and Max Horovitz, a 44 year old, severely obese, Jewish man with Aspergers Syndrome living in the chaos of New York.

Spanning twenty years and two continents, Mary and Max’s friendship survives much more than the average diet of life’s ups and downs. Like Harvie Krumpet, MARY AND MAX is innocent but not naive, as it takes us on a journey that explores friendship, autism, taxidermy, psychiatry, alcoholism, where babies come from, obesity, kleptomania, sexual difference, trust, copulating dogs, religious difference, agoraphobia and much, much more.

Having previously enjoyed Harvie Krumpet (running time approx. 22 minutes), I knew that I would probably enjoy Mary and Max just as much so, of course I went searching to see if I could find the whole movie. 😀 There are many, many clips from the movie floating around on YouTube but I eventually found the whole movie, broken up into 9 episodes (each 10 minutes) which can be viewed here (total running time approx. 90 minutes). Mary and Max has been available to buy on DVD or BluRay in “all good Australian DVD stores” since 21 October 2009, so I’ll have to find it and add it to my DVD collection.

Like Harvie Krumpet the characters in this movie are very real and evoke feelings of empathy in the viewer. In my opinion, the topic of autism/Asperger’s is portrayed realistically and with great sensitivity and good-natured humour. Definitely a movie worth seeing!

I should also add that T noticed Harvie Krumpet making a very brief and obscured cameo appearance in the Mary and Max movie. In a scene in the latter part of the movie Max goes into a typewriter shop to buy a new ink ribbon. The shopkeeper’s face can be briefly seen through the warped glass panels in the shop window — T recognised it as Harvie’s face and was certain this was the case when the shopkeeper said, “Thank you”, in the same distinctive voice used for Harvie’s character in the Harvie Krumpet movie. Trust an Aspie to notice an obscure little detail like that, LOL. 😀

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4 thoughts on “Mary and Max

  1. Yep, Harvie was great …and don’t forget you can watch Mary and Max online in 9 ten minute parts …link is above in the blog. 😀 Hopefully YouTube won’t pull it down for copyright reasons, not too soon anyway.

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    1. 26/01/2011
      Mary & Max was on TV tonight so I came back here to check the link and found that it has been deleted from YouTube …BUGGER! (probably due to copyright infringement). Oh well, you can type in “Mary & Max” to YouTube and get lots of links to snippets of the movie.

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